Why Healthcare Education is Always Changing and Never Ceasing

How a new content portal is making key research available to vascular access clinicians

By Eric Seger | October 2, 2019

Much like the Association for Vascular Access (AVA), its quarterly, scientific and peer-reviewed publication began under-the-radar. Even despite this, both are important representations of the healthcare education revolution. What started with a dozen clinicians in the Bay Area in 1985 has grown into a truly international organization with over 3000 members.

The Journal of the Association of Vascular Access (JAVA) aims to publish data on the new technologies and innovations that represent the prominent shifts in our specialty. Our fall 2019 issue featured articles on the use of visualization technology for PIVCs, utilizing ultrasonography on tablet-type technologies to assess veins for cannulation, and more.

While healthcare professionals have a responsibility to never stop furthering their education, it’s also imperative to keep the basics at the forefront. JAVA bears that responsibility, and with the help of Medline, clinicians will now be able to access the JAVA archives for years to come through the JAVA Legacy Content Portal.

The late Janet DeLong Pettit, MSN, RNC, NNP authored one of the most referenced articles in the journal’s history, “AVA Introduces the SAVE That Line! Campaign.”1 Introduced in 2006, the campaign has since been updated with shiny new starter kits that assist clinicians as they emphasize a back to basics approach at the bedside to reduce the risk of infection. An extra letter – I – also joined the fray, as well as a patient- and caregiver-friendly version. Clinicians share it with families and loved ones to educate them on the importance of proper IV care.

Denise Macklin, BSN, RNC, CRNI® penned a terrific review of the physical principles of fluid administration in 1999.2 It provides nurses with a basic understanding of how infusates flow through VADs, which enhances the caregiver’s ability to properly assess a site, develop an individualized plan of care for the patient, and properly intervene when problems arise.

“The Aging Venous System,” written by Robert Schelper, MD, PhD in 20033, outlines the critical points and consequences vascular access professionals must recognize in patients as they age. “It is incumbent upon each practitioner to recognize that skin atrophy may predict the atrophy of the supportive elements of the veins, which predisposes the vein to laceration,” Schelper writes.

And Deborah Richardson, RN, MS, CNS wrote a three-part series on the standards of care for vascular access clinicians that spanned the journal’s final issue in 2006 and its first two in 2007.4-6 Richardson focused on infection prevention, a critical part of vascular access care, by first reviewing skin cleansing agents and dressings and how to properly use them, before diving into the procedures involving central venous catheters (CVC). Part three reviewed flushing solutions and injection caps. Pathogens don’t care who or where you are, so this series is a jumping off point for remembering the essential pieces of infection prevention.

More recent articles include case studies on the rising yet complex vascular access procedure: Mid-thigh femoral catheter placement. Both Matt Ostroff, MSN, APN-BC, CRNI®, CPUI, VA-BC™7 and Constance Girgenti, BSN, RN, VA-BC™8 led efforts to publication on this topic. A survey of professions, settings and devices on the impact and safety associated with accidental dislodgement of vascular access devices from Nancy Moureau, RN, PhD, CRNI®, CPUI, VA-BC™9 in 2018 is also a prominent read.

For clinicians to focus on the future of the vascular access specialty, they must also remember previous resources. Laying the foundation through a review of the archived material in the recently established JAVA Legacy Content portal in addition to knowledge gleaned from the countless other journals is the first step.

The next step may not be known; education never stays in the same place. Neither can the education of healthcare professionals.

Learn how Medline specialists tailor vascular access solutions to improve efficiency and lower costs.

Sources

1.     Pettit JD, AVA introduces the SAVE that line! campaign. Journal of the Association for Vascular Access. 2006;11(1): 6-8. https://avajournal.com/doi/pdf/10.2309/java.11-1-3 Accessed September 20, 2019.
2.     Macklin D, What’s physics got to do with it?. Journal of the Association for Vascular Access. 1999;4(2): 7-11. https://avajournal.com/doi/pdf/10.2309/1083-0081-4.2.7 Accessed September 20, 2019.
3.     Schelper R, The aging venous system. Journal of the Association for Vascular Access. 2003;8(3): 8-10. https://avajournal.com/doi/pdf/10.2309/1552-8855-8.3.8. Accessed September 20, 2019.
4.     Richardson D, Vascular access nursing practice, standards of care, and strategies to prevent infection: a review of skin cleansing agents and dressing materials. Journal of the Association for Vascular Access. 2006;11(4):215-221. https://avajournal.com/doi/pdf/10.2309/java.11-4-14 Accessed September 20, 2019.
5.     Richardson D, Vascular access nursing practice, standards of care, and strategies to prevent infection: a primer on central venous catheters. Journal of the Association for Vascular Access. 2007;12(1):19-27. https://avajournal.com/doi/pdf/10.2309/java.12-1-7 Accessed September 20, 2019.
6.     Richardson D, Vascular access nursing practice, standards of care, and strategies to prevent infection: a review of flushing solutions and injection caps. Journal of the Association for Vascular Access. 2007;12(2):74-112. https://avajournal.com/doi/pdf/10.2309/java.12-2-9 Accessed September 20, 2019.
7.     Ostroff M, Moureau N, Ismail M, Review and case studies of mid-thigh femoral central venous catheter placement. Journal of the Association for Vascular Access. 2018;23(3):167-175. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.java.2018.06.004 Accessed September 20, 2019.
8.     Girgenti C, Pieroni S, Complex vascular access: mid-thigh femoral peripherally inserted central catheter placement. Journal of the Association for Vascular Access. 2018;23(4): 234-238. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.java.2018.07.005 Accessed September 20, 2019.
9. Moureau N, Impact and safety associated with accidental dislodgement of vascular access devices: a survey of professions, settings, and devices. Journal of the Association for Vascular Access. 2018; 23(4):203-215. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.java.2018.06.004 Accessed September 20, 2019.
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Eric Seger

Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the Association for Vascular Access

Eric Seger joined the Association for Vascular Access (AVA) in 2017 as its Director of Communications and the Editor-In-Chief of the Journal of the Association for Vascular Access. He oversees the publication process both for JAVA and Intravascular Quarterly (IQ), AVA’s quarterly electronic newsletter. An editor by trade, Eric’s background is in online and newspaper publishing, copy editing, and writing. He recruits researchers and reviews their submissions for publication in both JAVA and IQ and also manages AVA’s social media plan as part of the association’s overall communications strategy.

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